Tag Archives: africatown

Longshore Opportunity: Port of Seattle


THIS IS THE WEBSITE FOR MAKING A PUBLIC APPLICATION FOR THE DRAWING FOR POTENTIAL PROCESSING TOWARD STATUS AS AN “UNIDENTIFIED CASUAL” LONGSHORE WORKER IN THE PORT OF SEATTLE, WA

Application Period

From: September 8, 2022Through: September 15, 2022


READ THE FOLLOWING ANNOUNCEMENT BEFORE CONTINUING

LONGSHORE OPPORTUNITY: PORT OF SEATTLE, WA

All public applicants must complete the Online Application posted at http://seattle.casualdrawingapp.net/public. The Online Application requires that each applicant provide the applicant’s first and last names, (middle name is not required but recommended if there is one), mailing address, telephone number with Area Code, month of birth, numerical day of birth and a valid email address. Applications with missing information will not be accepted. Phone calls regarding the process will not be accepted and in-person or written applications submitted through the U.S. Postal Service will not be accepted. Applications can be submitted online beginning 8:00 a.m., PDT, on September 8, 2022 through 11:59 p.m., PDT, September 15, 2022. Applicants will be sent an email confirming submission of their application.

On or about September 26, 2022, a drawing will be held from a combination of timely received public applications and “Interest Card” applications.  If the number of timely public applications received exceeds that of the timely Interest Card applications received, a preliminary drawing will be held just among the public applications to collect a number equal to the amount of Interest Card applications.  A sequenced list of those selected for processing will be posted for 30 days at WWW.PMANET.ORG.  Applicants must be at least 18 years of age, present a valid  driver’s license with photograph, have no disqualifying convictions, have a sufficient knowledge of English to speak and understand written and verbal and safety warnings in English, and  be eligible to work in the U.S. Those selected for processing will be advised of additional requirements. Only one application per person. Anyone attempting to submit more than one application (of any type) will be disqualified. Those submitting an Interest Card application may not submit a public application as described in this ad. Duplication, sale or trade for value of an Interest Card or Interest Card code is strictly prohibited.  Violation of this rule will result in disqualification of the applicant as well as discipline and punishment of the seller or trader, up to and including possible deregistration or termination of longshore employment and dispatch privileges. There is no fee or charge for applying. No money should be paid to any person or organization related to this recruitment program. Casual longshore workers are not eligible to receive benefits provided under the collective bargaining agreement only to registered workers (for example, health insurance, pensions, holiday pay, vacation pay). There is no guarantee of employment, continued employment, or advancement; casual work is sporadic and never guaranteed, but casuals must nonetheless work sufficient available hours to retain longshore dispatch privileges.

A TWIC (Transportation Worker Identification Credential) is required by the Department of Homeland Security to enter all marine facilities. Applicants are urged to promptly familiarize themselves with TWIC application requirements: www.tsa.gov and 1-866-347-8371 are resources (not PMA, ILWU, or the Joint Port Labor Relations Committee/JPLRC).

Submitting an application does not guarantee processing or employment in the longshore industry. The procedures by which longshore processing and employment may be offered can be changed at any time and without notice at the discretion of the joint parties to the governing collective bargaining agreement.

Applicants are responsible for keeping the JPLRC advised of their current contact information. All contact information updates must be made in writing. Please send all contact information updates to: Seattle JPLRC – Casual Processing, P.O. Box 9348, Seattle, WA 98109-0348.

Any disputes or claims about any aspect of this casual process are subject to the collective bargaining agreement and its grievance procedures, must be in writing and must be received by the JPLRC (Seattle JPLRC – Casual Processing Grievance, P.O. Box 9348, Seattle, WA 98109-0348) within ten (10) days of the source of the complaint. No extensions. JPLRC decisions on grievances are final and binding.

PMA member companies are equal opportunity employers.

https://seattle.casualdrawingapp.net/public

Africatown Shelter Mobile Health Screening Event 1-13-2022

Onsite the mobile medical team offers clients:

Africatown Shelter Mobile Health Screening Event Thursday January 13, 2022 10am to 2pm

1607 Yesler Way

  • Walk-in primary care for acute and chronic conditions
  • STD, HIV and Hepatitis C testing
  • Family planning
  • Access to behavioral health and chemical dependency specialists
  • Naloxone overdose prevention training and kits
  • The medical van does not carry narcotics nor provide any prescription pain medications.

We can also help people connect to other community services including:

  • A doctor’s office that can provide follow-up care
  • Mental health care, including counseling
  • Substance abuse counseling and treatment via a harm reduction approach
  • Enrollment into health insurance
  • Enrollment into ORCA LIFT transportation assistance
  • Referrals to shelter, food banks, legal assistance and domestic violence programs
  • For other local community resources please call 211

With vision for ‘African American communities and spaces of the future,’ Africatown Plaza will be next to take shape in the Central District

Community members met this week for an all-day design symposium at Washington Hall in the Central District to plan “African American communities and spaces of the future” around the Puget Sound.

Read more Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

The event follows a major development in the Central District with the opening of the Liberty Bank Building and comes as the early design process for Africatown Plaza at Midtown, another fully affordable development around the 23rd and Union core, is about to begin.

“Overall, working to make sure that we still have a heart and soul and a place of unity and community,” the Africatown Community Land Trust’s K. Wyking Garrett said Saturday, before giving a shout out to last weekend’s Umoja Fest Parade, a Central Area staple since the 1940s. He wants Africatown, however, to be more than just these major celebrations, but places “where we can experience Black culture, Black music, Black culinary genius from throughout the diaspora.”


The Liberty Bank Building

At 24th and Union, the Capitol Hill Housing-led Liberty Bank Building now provides more than 100 affordable homes after opening this spring. Africatown hopes the new building can be a springboard for more equitable development in a neighborhood that has seen increased gentrification and felt the effects of mass incarceration in recent years.

Next will come Africatown Plaza at Midtown on the southern end of the Midtown Center block. Being planned as 130 units of 100% affordable housing plus street-level retail and commercial space, the project will be built at 23rd and Spring, just down from the Liberty Bank Building on the south end of the site of the former Midtown Plaza. It will include around 130 affordable housing units, specifically for “those who have been displaced due to rising rents,” as well as several thousand square feet of retail space, as previously reported by CHS.

Read more Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

Umojafest 2018 – August 3 – August 5 / AfricaTown Heritage Parade

Attractions include the AfricaTown Heritage Parade featuring dance troops and drill teams, Children’s Day & Familly Fun Village, Soul N The Park, Afrobeats & Roots Stage, Heal the Hood Basketball Tournament & Hip Hop 4 Peace stage and delicious flavors of the African diaspora from restaurants, food trucks, vendor marketplace and community resource fair and more!

Visit the UMOJAFEST Website!

Africatown Celebrating our History…Planning Our Future

Africatown Celebrating our History…Planning Our Future

Imagine Africatown Design Weekend

It was a great day in the Central District this past Sunday, July 8th. An estimated 300+ people came out for the Paint The Block Party creating a 30,000+ sq. ft. mural in honor of Black community that has called the Central District home for over 130 years and marking our place in the future of the Central District and Seattle. The paint party is helping to bring to life an interim activation that captures the essence of what community wants to see in the redeveloped 23rd & Union including space for Black community, culture, commerce.


Photo Beezie2000

The project is being led by Africatown Central District Preservation & Development Association and Studio Zewde in collaboration with Urban Artworks and made possible by Africatown Community Land Trust, Lake Union Partners and Capitol Hill Housing with support from Historic Central Area Arts & Cultural District, Seattle Office of Planning & Community Development, Weinstein AU, WG Clark Construction and Walsh Construction.

Also last week Africatown Community Land Trust was awarded an equitable development grant of $1,000,000 to help fund Africatown Plaza building to be developed with Capitol Hill Housing on the Midtown Center site and $75,000 for organization capacity. The overall development costs for the project are estimated at $42,000,000.

Now, this weekend join us to plan for the future of the Central District that makes the essence of the activation permanent at 23rd and Union and throughout the CD!

Imagine Africatown Design Weekend brings international architects to Seattle to imagine the future of Central District and Black neighborhoods

This weekend July 13-14 Africatown welcomes renowned designer Walter Hood, founder of Hood Design Studio and Pan African architect Nmadili Okumabua, founder Community Design & Planning Initiative Africa to Seattle to headline our first ever Imagine Africatown Central District Design Weekend, July 13-14 at the legendary Garfield High School.

On Friday the Design Town Hall will feature Walter and Nmadili will share ideas join Dr. Marcia Arunga with a featured performance by Dadabass.

After being inspired by the work and ideas of visionaries Walter Hood and Nmadili Okumabua and memories of the CD as told by Dr. Marcia Tate Arunga on Friday at the Design Town Hall, Saturday we will take to bringing our own ideas to life with an all day Design Cipher workshop.

Four sites in the Central District including Black community landmarks Seattle Vocational Institute and Bryant Manor will be reimagined as a local “Black Wall Street” or “Wakanda”, but these places could be anywhere we are: Renton, Kent, Federal Way, Leimert Park in LA, Harlem, Southside Chicago or Third Ward in Houston!

Let’s imagine and design thriving Black neighborhoods of the future. Places where our well being is the focus, our legacies are honored, our spirits are nourished, our genius is cultivated and our collective futures are bright!”

About Walter Hood

Walter Hood is the Creative Director and Founder of Hood Design Studio in Oakland, California. Hood Design Studio is his tripartite practice, working across art + fabrication, design + landscape, and research + urbanism. He is also a professor of landscape architecture at the University of California, Berkeley and lectures on professional and theoretical projects nationally and internationally. Walter designs and creates urban spaces and objects that are public sculpture. Believing everyone needs beauty in their life, he makes use of everyday objects to create new apertures through which to see the surrounding emergent beauty, strangeness, and idiosyncrasies of urban space. http://www.hooddesignstudio.com/

About Nmadili Okwumabua

Nmadili Okwumabua is an Atlanta based architect and CEO of Southern Sahara, a design consultancy specializing in the research and development of modern African architecture. Nmadili is also the founder of Founder of the Community Planning & Design Initiative Africa and a professor of African Architecture & Urban Design at Kennesaw State University in Atlanta, Georgia. https://www.cpdiafrica.org/the-founder/

Central District Design Weekend

Design Town Hall, July 13th, 5-8pm, Garfield High School

Design Cipher, July 14th, 10am-5pm, Garfield High School

Community Dinner, 14th, 5-9pm, 23rd & Union

Imagine Africatown Design Weekend

Copyright © 2018 Africatown Seattle, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you have attended or expressed interest in an Africatown event.

Our mailing address is:
Africatown Seattle
PO Box 22328
Seattle, WA 98122

23rd and Union development update: Notes on Africatown Plaza

As developers snag every available piece of land in the booming real estate market of Central Seattle, African American community members demand a seat at the table when it comes to who fills the future Africatown portion of Midtown development at 23rd and Union. How do you address the concerns of a diverse community while understanding the history of the land the development is being built on? By meeting, bringing those voices together, and giving them a chance to express their concerns and desires for positive change.

Read more Full Report

Plans for Africatown Plaza rise at 23rd and Union


Garrett, center, with Forterra’s Michelle Connor and Chris Persons of Capitol Hill Housing (Image: Africatown Plaza)

The newly formed Africatown Community Land Trust entered an agreement with Capitol Hill Housing and Lake Union Partners, the Seattle development company that bought the Midtown Center block in May.

Read more FULL REPORT

MLK DAY 2017

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From: Capitol Hill Seattle

Official crowd estimates for events like the annual Seattle MLK Day march are hard to come by but organizers said Monday the 2017 gathering might have been the largest in the 35-year history of the event.

You could also measure the crowd by the CHS video — four and a half minutes to walk from the start of the procession to the SPD contingent bringing up the rear. The marchers passed from Garfield High School to E Union then E Madison and onto the Federal Building downtown.

You can learn more about the history of the event and the day of workshops at Garfield High School that accompany it at mlkseattle.org

Here’s how Seattle became so segregated

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A new look at New Deal ‘redlining’ maps offers insight into subtle racism’s not-so-subtle predecessor

The “redlining” maps minted during the New Deal were a roadmap for investment in America’s cities. Seattle was no exception in warning bankers off extending loans to home buyers in non-white neighborhoods. Here’s a look some of the more racist descriptions offered about Seattle’s neighborhoods back in 1936. They’re rated “A” to “D,” with “A” being best.

Read more FULL ARTICLE

!*PLEASE READ AND SUPPORT! African-American Heritage Museum UPDATE #3

!*PLEASE READ AND SUPPORT! African-American Heritage Museum UPDATE #3

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POWER TO THE PEOPLE!
=======================
)From: “Black Autonomy”
)Subject: African-American Heritage Museum and Cultural Center UPDATE #3
) (1998):
)Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 14:18:35 PST

Marpessa Kupendua

African-American Heritage Museum and Cultural Center UPDATE #3 (1998):
“The Youth Action Committee Takes Control Of The Last Black Institution
In Seattle!”

As predicted, last night’s meeting at SVI was indeed turbulent. The
uncle toms brought in 3 uniformed Seattle Police officers, along with
East Precinct Lt. Harry Bailey (local “Weed and Seed director and 32nd
degree freemason).

So far, all the communiques I’ve sent out have been very long (and I
apologize to those who weren’t trying to read all of that), but I felt
it was important in order for those who weren’t there, particularly
those outside of Seattle, to have a clear picture of what’s going on;
thus all the details. I’ll try to be brief with this one and anyone have
questions please feel free to email me, write, or call the museum at
206-320-9321 for more info. Again, let me also offer everyone the
opportunity to review the relevant documents for themselves, send us $2
for postage and we’ll send you copies of everything we have.

To begin with, none of the grassroots concerns were on the agenda that
Bob and Co. prepared. In addition, the committee reports were fabricated
due to the fact that the only committees for the museum that have been
meeting regularly at the museum offices are the Youth Action Committee
and African International Affairs Committee. Omari Tahir, founder of the
museum/cultural center started the meeting with the complete history up
to the illegal activities of Bob Flowers, Bob Luciano, Pat Chandler, and
Harolynn Bobis (and others). He cited the relevant Revised Codes of
Washington and told the crowd of 100 or so what else the ‘toms have been
doing.

Read more FULL ARTICLE