Amid tension, more than 20,000 attend NYPD funeral

Amid tension, more than 20,000 attend NYPD funeral
nypd

NEW YORK (AP) — Thousands of police officers, state troopers, sheriff’s deputies and others from law enforcement agencies big and small across the country gathered at the New York City funeral of a slain officer killed with his partner in a brazen daytime ambush a week ago.

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Origins of the police

Origins of the police

Posted by David Whitehouse December 7, 2014

The Five Points district of lower Manhattan, painted by George Catlin in 1827. New York’s first free Black settlement, it became a mixed-race slum, home to Blacks and Irish alike, and a focal point for the stormy collective life of the new working class. Cops were invented to gain control over neighborhoods and populations like this.

The Five Points district of lower Manhattan, painted by George Catlin in 1827. New York’s first free Black settlement, Five Points was also a destination for Irish immigrants and a focal point for the stormy collective life of the new working class. Cops were invented to gain control over neighborhoods and populations like this.

In England and the United States, the police were invented within the space of just a few decades—roughly from 1825 to 1855.
The new institution was not a response to an increase in crime, and it really didn’t lead to new methods for dealing with crime. The most common way for authorities to solve a crime, before and since the invention of police, has been for someone to tell them who did it.

Besides, crime has to do with the acts of individuals, and the ruling elites who invented the police were responding to challenges posed by collective action. To put it in a nutshell: The authorities created the police in response to large, defiant crowds. That’s
— strikes in England,
— riots in the Northern US,

— and the threat of slave insurrections in the South.
So the police are a response to crowds, not to crime.
I will be focusing a lot on who these crowds were, how they became such a challenge. We’ll see that one difficulty for the rulers, besides the growth of social polarization in the cities, was the breakdown of old methods of personal supervision of the working population. In these decades, the state stepped in to fill the social breach.

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Help Umoja Peace Center Plant Seeds and Grow Dreams!

umojafestpeacecenter

Help Umoja Peace Center Plant Seeds and Grow Dreams!

“Best day ever! Today we had a very interesting class session. We talked about what a perfect community would look like.”–Khabirah

“Working as a summer intern so far I have seen what it is like to work as an adult and how to pay attention to detail. Last week at the computer programming workshop I learned how to code which is a very import skill to have.”–Malcom

“Yesterday we had a community discussion about how things are and what things need to be. So we are all working together to create a better community as the short term goal and a better place to live as the long term goal.”–
-Isiah

These are words from a few of the youth interns who benefit from Umoja Peace Center’s Young Geniuses program.

From coding workshops that bridge the digital divide–to international art projects–to embracing our global citizenry, the Umoja Peace Center (UPC) Young Geniuses program is providing high quality learning opportunities to youth in our community. It takes a village to raise a child and UPC is the village we need right now.

UPC fulfills a unique niche in Seattle as an organization devoted to building job skills, confidence and cultural pride in young people of African descent. Why is building cultural pride so important? Because in the words of Marcus Garvey, “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.” UPC builds strong roots by helping young people realize their full potential. Through education enhancement projects that build marketable skills, self confidence, cultural pride and identity, UPC is creating future leaders and innovators.

UPC needs funds to pay for learning materials for our Young Geniuses workshops and for expenses related to taking youth on field trips to gain knowledge and new experiences. Your support is critical to realizing the vision of a vibrant community of lifelong learners whose creativity and ingenuity have a positive impact our local and global community.

You can learn more about the ways UPC is changing lives at: http://umojapeacecenter.com.

Will you make an investment in our future by supporting the UPC Young Geniuses program? Can you help with a donation of $5, $10 or even $25 today?

A UPC supporter has helped us get the ball rolling by donating $5,000! Our goal is to match this amount and raise an additional $5,000 by December 31st, 2014.

Giving is easy. You can do so online at: DONATE TO UPC

Go to: Make a donation today! Then choose Umoja Peace Center from the “I am donating for” drop down menu. You can give with a debit or credit card. Seattle Neighborhood Group (SNG) is the fiscal sponsor for UPC and all donations are tax deductible.

You can also mail a check payable to Umoja Peace Center:

Umoja PEACE Center

c/o Seattle Neighborhood Group

1810 E. Yesler Way
Seattle WA 98122
Reference: TAX ID # 94-3098473

With your donation we can expand our reach and provide more educational programs and opportunities for young people.

Thank you so much for your support!

Yalonda Sinde
UPC Boardmember

Seattle Times story shows charter school law is working

December 10, 2014

A front-page story in The Seattle Times by Leah Todd reports on troubles at First Place Scholars Charter School, the headline saying the school is in “disarray” over recent leadership changes. Yet the details of the story show that Washington’s best-in-the-nation charter school law is working as intended.

The school’s first principal and five board members have left. The First Place board has selected a new chair, respected former Democratic state legislator Dawn Mason, and hired a new principal, a former superintendent from Marysville, Linda Whitehead. The new principal in turn is hiring new staff, particularly a special education teacher and two more full-time classroom aides, once background checks are completed. In addition, the principal is submitting a plan this month to make sure the school complies with federal disability law.

The rapid changes are good news for First Place students. Because it is a charter public school, leaders at First Place are responding much faster than traditional public schools, which can languish for years with poor academics and low graduation rates while underserved students age out of their programs. First Place charter school serves low-income and homeless children, whose parents know that a good education is the key to escaping poverty and moving on to a better life.

The same cannot be said of many traditional public schools in Seattle. Principals at these schools do not benefit from the flexibility and rapid improvement afforded by the state charter school law. For example, strict union regulations bar principals from quickly dismissing and hiring teachers as needed to serve the needs of students. Tight seniority rules require that younger teachers are let go first, even when a different decision would be better for students. Parents at Seattle Garfield High School are learning first-hand how heartless the traditional system can be, where a popular teacher is being threatened with dismissal.

The result is a poor-quality public education for too many children. Nine of Seattle’s 95 public schools, comprising 4,000 students, rank in the Lowest Five Percent statewide in the State Board of Education Achievement Index.

These are:
Martin Luther King Elementary School – 356 students
Highland Park Elementary School – 396 students
Cleveland High School – 805 students
West Seattle Elementary School – 443 students
Hawthorne Elementary School – 345 students
Rainier Beach High School – 516 students
Madrona K-8 School – 291 students
Seattle World School – 280 students
Interagency Programs – 616 students
A further eight Seattle public schools are listed as Underperforming on the state Achievement Index.

These public schools fail children year after year, but this outcome is considered business as usual by the system. When parents press about underperforming schools, District officials announce a five-year plan, setting forth distant goals for improvement. When it becomes clear the goals won’t be met, officials simply issue a new five-year plan.

Instead of trapping families in a tiresome unproductive cycle, traditional schools could give principals control over their budgets, end seniority assignments, which send the neediest children to the least capable teachers, and allow local schools to hire the best teachers, regardless of union rules.

Many Seattle families believe nothing can be done, because the power of the central office and the SEA teachers union seems too great. The system works well for adults, but often shorts children. District officials certainly benefit from Seattle’s $689 million school budget, much of which is spent on administration. Typically, only 59 cents of every education dollars makes it to the classroom.

It may look like bad press, but the attention First Place Scholars Charter School is receiving is a good thing. Families there say they plan to keep their children at the school, and enrollment is expected to increase over the next few years.

The attention and flexibility afforded by the state charter school law means low-income and homeless students at First Place are quickly getting the educational help they need, something that cannot be said about too many of our public schools.

Union says officers weren’t informed gun might be toy in Cleveland shooting

tamir-rice-1206

CLEVELAND — A dispatcher didn’t tell officers involved in the fatal shooting of a 12-year-old boy last month that the gun might not be real or that the person might be a child, a Cleveland police union official said yesterday.

Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Association president Jeff Follmer said officers had no way of knowing that Tamir Rice was carrying an airsoft gun, which shoots nonlethal plastic pellets, when a rookie cop shot him in the abdomen on Nov. 22. Follmer added that the dispatcher followed protocol when sending the officers on what police call a “gun run.”

Surveillance video released by police shows Tamir being shot within two seconds of the patrol car’s stopping near him. In that time, Officer Timothy Loehmann told the boy to put his hands up, but he didn’t, police brass and Follmer said. Tamir had nearly pulled the gun out of his waistband when Loehmann shot him, Follmer said.

The man who had called 911 told dispatchers someone was pointing a pistol that was “probably fake” and scaring everyone. The caller also said the person was probably a child.

Officer Frank Garmback pulled into the park after seeing Tamir at a distance and slammed on the brakes when Tamir did not run, as they had expected, Follmer said. That caused the car to slide on the slick grass and stop within a few feet of the boy, Follmer said.

Garmback and Loehmann had discussed tactics while approaching the park, Follmer said. Garmback was Loehmann’s field training officer that day.

The officers also thought they were confronting someone around 20 years old, not 12, Follmer said. They didn’t learn Tamir’s age until later in the day.

“In their mindset, they’re still thinking it’s an older male, not a 12-year-old kid,” Follmer said. “That’s the reality. That’s what they see right there, right then.

An autopsy released yesterday said Tamir was 5 feet 7 and weighed 195 pounds. He was shot once in the abdomen, and the bullet damaged a major vein and his intestines, the Cuyahoga County medical examiner concluded in labeling the death a homicide.

Loehmann joined the Cleveland force in March after spending six months in 2012 with the police department in suburban Independence. Personnel files released on Wednesday showed that supervisors in Independence had decided he lacked the maturity needed to work in their department. A letter in his file said there was a pattern of a lack of discretion and of not following instructions.
A grand jury will consider whether criminal charges are merited. The officers are on paid administrative leave.

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Omari Tahir Garrett on Michael Medved Show

MICHAEL, I WAS ON YOUR SHOW FOR 2 HOURS IN 2002 CONCERNING MAYOR PAUL SCHELL ACCIDENT? I STILL HAVE NOT RECEIVED A COPY OF THE TAPE AS YOU PROMISED???? I WILL GLADLY DEBATE YOU LIVE ON YOUR PROGRAM ABOUT YOUR VIEWS ON AFRICANS BORN IN AMERICA DUE TO EUROPEAN SETTLER COLONIAL TERRORISM INACCURATELY REFERRED TO AS THE “AFRICAN SLAVE TRADE”??? SINCE I WAS BORN IN AMERICA DUE TO MY DNA BEING KIDNAPPED FROM AFRICA, I THINK I HAVE A MUCH BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF “POST TRAUMATIC SLAVERY SYNDROME” THAN A SOCALLED WHITE AMERICAN SETTLER OCCUPIER OF NATIVE AMERICAN “HOMELANDS”???? YOU CAN REACH ME BY EMAIL OR PHONE 206 639-0162 TO SCHEDULE TIME AND DATE ON ON AIR DEBATE ABOUT YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF AFRICAN AMERICANS CONTINUING STRUGGLE TO OVER COME EUROPEAN COLONIAL SETTLER “JUDEO-CHRISTIAN” TERRORISM??

Omari