The Annals of Settler Colonialism: German Namibia

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The Annals of Settler Colonialism: German Namibia (1)
Posted on 09/27/2012 by Juan Cole

Settler colonialism has a long and unsavory history and always involves displacing people from their land, driving them into penury, making and keeping them stateless, and, often, killing large numbers of them. The settlers brand resistance to their squatting on other people’s land “terrorism” by “savages.”

One of the few contemporary examples of settler colonialism is that of Israelis in the Palestinian West Bank. The number of Palestinians who have died from infant mortality, poor health conditions and lack of sanitation, loss of farms and other property and attendant penury, and other ill effects of the Israeli expulsion of their families in 1948 and 1967 and then occupation and colonization since 1967 is surely in the hundreds of thousands at least, though this toll is seldom considered. (As is typical in Western settler colonialism, the cost to the indigenous population of the enterprise is elided.)
Saree Makdisi’s Palestine Inside Out is an eloquent exposition of the banal horrors of occupied life under the Israeli boot.

Among the more important and yet amazingly little-known precedents for settler colonialism is German Southwest Africa (now Namibia). IC is carrying the six-part series.

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Colonialism and a Dark Past

Colonialism

Colonialism and a Dark Past
By Paul Sixpence

Ghana’s Dr Kwame Nkrumah addressed delegates at the All African People’s Conference in Accra, on 5-13, December 1958. He called for the representatives of the attending countries to actively pursue independence from colonialism. In the decade that followed more than 30 African countries regained independence.

Africa under the yoke of colonialism
The transformation of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) to the African Union (AU) saw the commemorative history of Africa under colonialism being largely delegated to individual African nation – states.

Continental commemorative initiatives today act subsidiary to national independence celebrations. However, as outlined in this article, it still remains essential for Africa to collectively remember the shared painful history of the continent under the yoke of colonialism.

The communitarian nature of African societies point to a situation were the collective remembrance of human rights abuses can offer Africa an opportunity to redefine contemporary challenges and posit sustainable solutions to some of the most stubborn challenges afflicting the continent today. It is without doubt that colonialism negatively impacted the development of African social, political and economic systems. Africa’s colonial legacy is punctuated by exploitation, racism and the mass plunder of natural resources.

1876 – 1912 colonialism takes root in Africa
The late 19th century saw the intensification of imperial conquest by European nations. Between 1876 – 1912 five major European powers, namely, Germany, Italy, Portugal, France and Britain intensified their imperial agenda from the Cape to Morocco.1 It was during this period that the Berlin Conference of 1885 was convened, with the major aim of ‘slicing up Africa’ among the major European powers.2
Colonialism as an episode in Africa’s history brought with it a multitude of challenges to the people Africa.

It was colonialism that introduced the mass exploitation of African labour and resources. Settler governments disrupted Africa’s political and economic systems. The disruption of Africa’s social, political and economic systems has manifested itself in post – colonial African nation-states that are unable to redefine socio-economic and political development in relation to the needs of the majority of their populations.3 Political and economic systems inherited by the post-colonial African governments were tailored to benefit the settler regimes. Without alternative political and economic systems on the table, Africa has no option but to rely on external partners for its development.

The political stability and economic development of Africa is threatened by its history as much as the current leadership crisis on the continent. It is difficult to comprehend how the inherited systems which were centred on ‘exploitation without responsibility and without redress’4 can all of a sudden transform the development prospects of independent Africa.

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Fred Stephens: How lax management contributed to Seattle school scandal

Fred Stephens: How lax management contributed to Seattle school scandal

Shaw capital working management tips: Fred Stephens: How lax management contributed to Seattle school scandal

In early 2005, as construction cranes dominated the skyline, African-American activists demanded that Seattle Public Schools give more work to minority contractors. Their complaints had grown louder as public agencies ended affirmative action in the years after passage of Initiative 200.

“I want my jobs back, or I’m going to be a thorn in somebody’s side, OK?” Harold Wright, an electrical contractor, said during a February 2005 School Board meeting.

Within weeks, Wright said, he and other contractors were introduced to Fred Stephens at a meeting with then-schools Superintendent Raj Manhas.

Stephens, who had spent most of his career in government, soon was hired as the district’s facilities director and began mending relations between the School Board and minority-owned construction firms.

And on paper, he succeeded. Millions of dollars in contracts were flowing and the tension with minority contractors eased.

In reality, the program was steadily collapsing under the weight of mismanagement. On June 28, five years after he took the job, the district called Seattle police to report an alleged theft of $35,000 by the man Stephens hired as a liaison to the contractors.

That very day, Stephens was nailing down details of his new job, a top post with former Gov. Gary Locke at the U.S. Commerce Department in Washington, D.C., that he had sought for more than a year.

Stephens would be there, 2,700 miles away, as auditors closed in on a financial scandal that would cost Superintendent Maria Goodloe-Johnson her job.

While political and financial costs for the district have mushroomed, Stephens, 64, has been largely silent. He declined to answer more than a dozen detailed questions, responding only with a few terse e-mails to The Seattle Times. He puts the blame solely on Silas W. Potter Jr., the manager who ran the contracting program.

Stephens’ friends say a family tragedy may have contributed to his lax oversight of Potter. Stephens says he believes investigations “will demonstrate that I have committed no wrong doing.”

But a series of expert reviews found that, despite one warning after another, Stephens allowed Potter to turn the minority-business program into a favor factory, doling out at least $1.8 million in questionable or wasteful contracts.

The consequences of Stephens’ “major management failure,” as one investigator called it, are piling up.

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Exploring Seattle’s International District: What to Do & Eat

Food Tuesday, September 17, 2013 Written by Erin Burchfield

Seattle’s food scene has long been influenced by its location on the Pacific Rim. Each neighborhood has its own Asian inspired restaurant, many within walking distance of one another. But for those eager to branch out from their neighborhood spot, and try new healthy eats, head to the true mecca of Seattle’s Asian food scene: the Chinatown-International District.
ID
How to get there
With a significant Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino and Southeast Asian presence in the area, the Chinatown-International District (dubbed the “I.D.”) is the center of Seattle’s Asian Community. Located south of Seattle’s downtown corridor, South Jackson and South King Street anchor the neighborhood.
What to see & do
As you’re walking the side streets, you’ll take in many of the familiar Chinatown sights: Peking ducks hanging from store windows, apothecaries stocked with endless shelves of medicinal herbs and dim sum restaurants with lines out the door on Sunday morning. Before you settle on a place to stop and eat, explore the I.D. and work up an appetite with a 90-minute walking tour offered by the Wing Luke Museum, which covers the history and culture of the neighborhood. If you’d rather explore on your own, download this free, self-guided walking map from History Link. Starting at the historic Union Station, you’ll stop by one of Seattle’s most elaborate P-Patches where you can take in the sights of the community garden, swing by the Wing Luke Asian Museum and see many historic hotels and sights along the way.

Eat
With more restaurants per block than any other neighborhood in Seattle, it’s hard to choose just one place for a healthy lunch or dinner. A few highlights include:
Green Leaf: For authentic Vietnamese food, look no further than Green Leaf restaurant. A popular (and often crowded) Seattle establishment, Green Leaf has been run by the Kuang family since 2005.

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Saturday Oct 12 – More4Mann Mural Project & Banner Drop Off this Saturday

From: “More 4Mann”
Date: Oct 10, 2013 11:28 PM
Subject: More4Mann Mural Project & Banner Drop Off this Saturday
To:
Cc:

THIS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2013 @ 9AM

THE AFRICATOWN CULTURAL INOVATION CENTER @ THE HORACE MAN SCHOOL ON 24TH AND CHERRY

Do you believe in justice and equality for all?

Do you believe in equitable education for all?

Do you want to see more effective education for all students in Seattle Public Schools?

So do we!

We are faced with a crisis in Seattle Public Schools! Black children and families across the district are not receiving the education and services they deserve. The opportunity gap continues to grow! Now is the time bridge the opportunity gap.

The More4Mann Campaign seeks to partner with Seattle Public Schools to assist in advancing the achievement of black children by decreasing and ending the opportunity gap.

We are actively providing culturally relevant education for black children and families.

The More4Mann Campaign is working to establish a the AfricaTown Cultural Innovation Center in the Horace Mann School on 24th & Cherry. The Central District of Seattle is an historically black neighborhood and Horace Mann is an historical landmark.

The More4Mann Campaign is working to further establish AfricaTown Cultural Innovation Center in the Horace Mann building on 24th & Cherry and WE NEED YOUR HELP.

We are still working with Seattle Public Schools to achieve an agreement that benefits both the district and the community. This plan will:

1) Provide AfricaTown with accessible and comparably affordable space until the completion of the renovation on the Horace Mann School.

2) Will provide future space and partnership in the Horace Mann School post the completion of the renovations.

3) Will be as community partnership that will assist the school district in achieving it’s goal of decreasing and ending the opportunity gap.

We are asking organization in support of the Campaign to:

1) Invite your constituents to the Mural Installation this Saturday, October 12th @ 9am. Seattle Public Schools invited us to design, paint and install murals at Horace Mann to beautify the space for renovation.

2) Send a member of your organization with a banner that has your name and/or Logo OR send members of your organization to the event to create a banner. These will be hung on the building as a public display of the organizations that are in support of the More4Mann campaign.

We will provide breakfast and family friend activities.

We need:

1) Art supplies

2) Paint & Spray

3) Banners

4) Ply wood

If you have questions please email us at:

More4Mann@gmail.com

Find the event on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/events/562909970423081/?context=create&ref_dashboard_filter=calendar#

Pan-African magazine says Africa has 55 billionaires, world’s richest black Nigerian woman

patrice-motsepe

From: AP

LAGOS, Nigeria — A pan-African magazine says Africa has many more billionaires than previously reported, 55 of them worth more than $143 billion including a Nigerian said to be the richest black woman in the world.

“Move over, Oprah!” Ventures Africa says in its latest edition published this week.

Editor-in-chief Uzodinma Iweala said Tuesday the magazine’s estimates are “on the conservative side.”

The report predictably identifies Nigerian manufacturer Aliko Dangote as the richest African worth $20.2 billion, among 20 Nigerians listed.

Africa Ventures put the average net worth of Africa’s billionaires at $2.6 billion and their average age at 65. The oldest billionaires are Kenyan industrialist Manu Chandaria and Egyptian property tycoon Mohammed Al-Fayed, both aged 84. The youngest billionaires are Mohammed Dewji of Tanzania and Nigerian oil trader Igho Sanomi, both 38 years old.

Nigeria, South Africa and Egypt had the highest numbers of the richest Africans, with nine in South Africa and eight in Egypt. It said Algeria, Angola, Zimbabwe and Swaziland only have one billionaire each. It identified billionaires in only 10 of Africa’s 53 countries.

The magazine’s survey surprised by identifying oil tycoon Folorunsho Alakija as the richest black woman in the world, saying that she is worth $7.3 billion.

Forbes magazine in its respected list had estimated Alakija’s fortune at $600 million and Oprah Winfrey’s worth at $2.9 billion.

The Forbes list of Africa’s 40 Richest has only 16 billionaires including two Nigerians.

Last month, Forbes published a story describing Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos’ daughter, Isabel, as Africa’s only female billionaire worth about $3 billion.

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ALERT! Superintendent Jose Banda at Horace Mann Oct 5

Wyking

To updates@northwesthiphopfest.com

Oct 4

Superintendent Jose Banda is scheduled to speak at 1pm about future of Horace Mann building at Africatown Education Summit tomorrow.

Show up if you can support

Saturday, October 5th, 12pm-4pm at Horace Mann we will be reconvening our Africatown Education Summit to continue developing our plan and consolidate our collective resources to grow the genius in our children.

Watch video from Africatown Center for Education & Innovation – http://youtu.be/Rc6yNiIMr1Q

The Africatown Center for Education & Innovation is about cultivating the beauty and genius in our children and community. Below are some examples of what we we are focused on cultivating, enjoy…

AFRICAN AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT BUILDS GLOBAL TECH COMPANY FROM ST. LOUIS

http://fox2now.com/2013/09/02/15-year-old-millionaire-owns-it-company

TEENAGE GIRLS FROM AFRICA INVENT A URINE-POWERED GENERATOR

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/african-teens-create-urine-powered-generator/5206

SELF TAUGHT AFRICAN TEEN DJ/INVENTOR WOWS M.I.T.

10-YEAR OLD NIGERIAN-AMERICAN FILMMAKER

14 YEAR OLD BLACK YOUTH INVENTS SURGICAL TECHNIQUE –

http://blacklikemoi.com/2012/01/black-teen-invents-surgical-procedure/