Why China won’t be a better superpower: Believe in people, not states

People in the West ought to wake up and emulate the popular revolts of Brazil and Turkey, suggests Barkawi.

In a thoughtful column, Murtaza Hussain asks whether the world might be better off with the rise of China than it was under Western and US hegemony?

After all, European imperialism and US wars since 1945 have caused millions of deaths; the Western sense of superiority prevents any fair dialogue with others; and the great liberal democracies have been revealed as states who torture those they suspect, assassinate their enemies with impunity from drone aircraft, and spy on everyone including their citizens on a previously unimaginable scale.

Meanwhile, argues Hussain, China has no tradition of invading other countries; has a respectful attitude towards other Asian countries due to the Confucian virtues; and has nothing in its history “remotely comparable to the industrialised exploitation and mass-murder which as characterised the Western colonial project.”

Episode 1: The dramtic rise

Evidently, Hussain has not heard of the Great Leap Forward between 1958 and 1961. This was Mao’s effort to rapidly industrialise China and collectivise its agriculture. The death toll from a combination of famine and state terror was somewhere between 18 and 45 million. Then there was the Cultural Revolution between 1966 and 1976, another exercise in state terror which saw mass purges, millions of people displaced, and much of China’s cultural heritage destroyed.

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Unlike the US, China does not have a substantial history of invading and subjugating the inhabitants of far-flung lands.

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Murtaza Hussain is a Toronto-based writer and analyst focused on issues related to Middle Eastern politics.

China is one of the most influential commercial players in Iraq’s oil boom [Reuters]

“The nationswhich today own the world’s resources fear the rise of China and wish to postpone the day of that rise.” – Rabindranath Tagore, 1915

Until the mid-20th century, China suffered what has been termed as the “Century of Humiliation” – a period of subjugation and oppression by Western military powers (as well as the Japanese). During this time Western imperialists flooded the country with drugs, raped and murdered its subjects with impunity and – due to both insatiable greed and abject ignorance to concepts such as culture and history – wantonly desecrated the priceless monuments of ancient Chinese civilisation.

At the outset of this period – when hordes of English soldiers destroyed Beijing’s ancient Summer Palace in an orgy of looting and arson – Major General Charles Gordon said, “You can scarcely imagine the beauty and magnificence of the places we burnt” – which in many ways was emblematic of the entire carnivorous project of Western imperialism in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Today, however, Rabindranath Tagore’s prophecy about China seems to have come to fruition, and the modern heirs to rapacious criminals such as Gordon now openly lament their fear of rising Chinese power.

In the place of the former colonial forces such as England and France, however, today, sits the US, the world’s only remaining military superpower. While since the fall of the Soviet Union the US has been widely considered to be the preeminent nation globally, in recent years it has fallen into an observable malaise.

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Africatown Community declares Liberty Bank a Historic Landmark

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Africatown Community declares Liberty Bank a Historic Landmark

Posted on June 27, 2013 by africatowncommunity

The Africatown Community has declared The Liberty Bank of Seattle an Historical and Cultural Preservation site. Liberty was chartered in 1968 and was the Pacific Northwest’s first and only black owned bank.

The property address is 2320 E Union WA 98122 located where the old Key Bank now stands. Liberty Bank was brought into a legal lawsuit in the early 1990′s.

The Seattle Historic Preservation Program.

In 1970, the Seattle City Council secured Pioneer Square’s survival with the City’s first historic preservation district, and voters approved an initiative for the Pike Place Market historic district two years later.

In 1973, the Seattle City Council adopted a Landmarks Preservation Ordinance to safeguard properties of historic and architectural significance around the city.

Historic Preservation Program.

Whether it’s a 19th century log house, an Art Deco school or a prehistoric shell midden, these places are silent witnesses to the history of King County and to its people’s lives and cultures.

The Africatown Community feels it is in the best interest of the community as a whole, for its only black owned bank to be designated a Historical and Preservation site.

To read more regarding the lawsuit that involved Liberty Bank, refer to the link below:

Liberty Bank – FDIC Certificate #:27268

940 F.2d 465: Federal Deposit Insurance corporation, As Receiverfor Liberty Bank of Seattle, Plaintiff, v. Sim Henderson, et al., Defendants.J.Thomas Wood; Barbara Wood, Husband and Wife, Defendants-counter-claimants-plaintiffs-appellants, v. Thomas Oldfield, Counter-defendant-appellee.
Liberty Bank Lawsuit

8 thoughts on “Africatown Community declares Liberty Bank a Historic Landmark”
Ian on June 27, 2013 at 4:44 pm said:

I am no expert on the topic, but I think Liberty Bank was not founded solely by African Americans. I believe it was a multi-cultural affair with a Jewish founder (Jack Richlen) & an American of Japanese descent – George Takuta (not sure on spelling). Let’s not re-write history!

shamwow on June 27, 2013 at 8:18 pm said:
Nowhere does it say that the bank was founded solely by African Americans. Nowhere. What an interesting accusation about re-writing history. I wonder where the motivation for your comment truly lies.

Really, it’s an interesting and ironic thing you say about re-writing history. That’s an entirely different conversation though.

Liberty bank was the only black owned bank in Seattle. That is a well documented fact. You can re-write the history however you want.

Ian on June 27, 2013 at 10:16 pm said:
Shamwow – those founders were also shareholders.

Ryan A on June 27, 2013 at 8:25 pm said:
Am I right to assume that giving the old Liberty Bank historical status would effectively kill Capitol Hill Housing’s plan to build affordable housing at this site?

banking history on June 27, 2013 at 8:57 pm said:
Liberty bank was closed in June of 1988. With backing investment from the FDIC and major local powers (Boeing, Weyerhauser…) it was folded into Emerald City Bank, and remained the only African-American owned/operated bank in WA. The Times and PI archives have many articles on the mismanagement of Emerald City that led to its closure in 1993. Key bank operated at the site for 20 years.

melissa on June 27, 2013 at 9:17 pm said:
I don’t understand. Is it still important if blacks did not own it?

Ian on June 27, 2013 at 10:15 pm said:
Ryan – historic designation would mean it would cost the developer more money if they had to maintain some aspect of the original buildings integrity or character.

csw on June 27, 2013 at 10:38 pm said:
Would a plaque and a photo be enough? With perhaps an additional display in the office of the new building?

Omari on June 27, 2013 at 11:19 pm said:
Your comment is awaiting moderation.
EVERY INSTITUTION THAT AFRICATOWN PEOPLE HAVE DEVELOPED HAS BEEN TAKEN OVER / SUBVERTED / ROBBED BY DOWNTOWN EUROPEAN SETTLER COLONIAL “JUDEO-CHRISTIAN” TERRORIST AS WAS DONE TO ALL NATIVE AMERICAN “INDIANS” INSTITUTIONS. THEY ARE AIDED BY THE CLARENCE THOMAS / NORM RICE / SAM AND HERM MCKINNEY NEO-COLONIAL SELF / COMMUNITY HATERS. THESE INSTITUTIONS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO SOIC (SEATTLE OPPORTUNITES, INDUSTRIAL CENTER), VOLUME FOODS (CO-OP GROCERY STORE) MODEL CITIES, BLACK FRONT CO-OP GROCERIES STORES, NEGRO VOTERS LEAGUE, CORE (CONGRESS OF RACIAL EQUALITY, CENTRAL AREA SCHOOL COUNCIL, CAMP (CENTRAL AREA MOTIVATION PROGRAM) ,, BLACK ACADEMY OF MUSIC, BLACK ARTS WEST, BLACK PANTHER PARTY, CAYA (CENTRAL AREA YOUTH ASSOCIATION, SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL LITTLE LEAGUE, LIBERTY BANK, CENTRAL AREA CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION, CAPDA (CENTRAL AREA PUBLIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY), SOUL ACADEMY , AFRICAN AMERICAN ACADEMY, CENTRAL AREA SCHOOLS ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (TT MINOR, HORACE MANN, HARRISON / M.L. KING), MEANY MIDDLE SCHOOL , GARFIELD A AND GARFIELD B , CANNON HOUSE, RANDOLPH CARTER INDUSTRIAL WORKSHOP, NEGRO VOTERS LEAGUE, AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM AND CULTURE CENTER AT THE FORMER COLMAN SCHOOL SITE (NOW 36 CONDOS / APARTMENTS OWNED BY EUROPEAN SETTLER SEATTLE HOUSING RESOURCE GROUP WITH FAKE NAAM SCAM MUSEUM IN THE OLD GYM AREA ETC

YES THE DESTRUCTIVE EUROPEAN SETTLER ANTI- INDIAN / ANTI -BLACK INSTITUTIONS HAVE BEEN VERY ACTIVE ALONG WITH THEIR NEO-COLONIAL MESSY JESSEY JACKSON & SONS PREACHER / POLITICIAN “CIVIL RIGHTS” CAREERIST PUPPETS. YET STILL WE RISE!!!!! THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES, Omari Tahir FOUNDER / VICE-PRESIDENT AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM AND CULTURE CENTER AT THE FORMER COLMAN SCHOOL SITE, CO-CHAIR BLAACK ALLIANCE FOR EDUCATION (1970 TO PRESENT)

Grandmother says she watched officer shoot girl, 7

Beneath a multi-colored quilt of Disney cartoon characters, 7-year-old Aiyana Stanley-Jones lay peacefully on the living room couch of her grandmother’s first-floor flat on Detroit’s east side.

Mertilla Jones lay at the other end, having recently put the girl to sleep.

Within seconds — maybe as few as three — a stun grenade smashed through a window, exploding over the couch. Armed, black-clad and masked police officers swarmed into the living room and, moments later, Aiyana lay bleeding to death with a gunshot wound to her head.

“As soon as they came in, their guns were just pointing right there, and he pulled the trigger,” Aiyana’s grandmother, Mertilla Jones said Monday of Joseph Weekley during the Detroit police officer’s involuntary manslaughter trial in Wayne County Circuit Court.

“I seen the light leave out of her eyes and the blood started gushing out her mouth and she was dead,” testified the 50-year-old Jones, who then broke into tears.

For members of the Detroit police special response team, the May 2010 nighttime raid on the two-family flat on Lillibridge was one of hundreds they had taken part in as a unit. This time they were being shadowed by a crew from the reality TV show, “The First 48.”

Armed with an MP5 submachine gun and behind a shield, team veteran Weekley was selected as point man for the operation — tasked with being first into the home in search of murder suspect, Chauncey Owens.

Weekley has said his gun accidentally fired when Mertilla Jones bumped into him or grabbed it. Prosecutors say he was negligent in failing to control his weapon.

Jones testified she rolled onto the floor after the noise and flash from the grenade, and was on her stomach when Weekley stormed in.

She said Aiyana’s head was propped against the armrest of the couch as she slept and Weekley was holding the gun right next to the armrest when his weapon discharged.

“The gun went off and shot her in the head. I started screaming and hollering. … ‘Y’all done killed my grandbaby,'” Jones told the courtroom.

Special response team member Larry Davis testified Monday that Weekley told him after the shooting that someone grabbed his weapon.

“I told him things would be OK. That’s about it,” Davis said.

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Editorial: Seattle School Board must do better for kids

The Seattle School Board is rife with infighting and mutual distrust, says an outside consultant hired by the board.

THE Seattle School Board is dysfunctional. Years of infighting and mutual distrust should not be tolerated — it comes at the expense of students.

This insight comes from an outside consultant, hired by the board for $7,500, to tell it what the public observes every other Wednesday evening.

Asked to rate themselves, board members gave the lowest marks to how well they worked together and fostered a trusting relationship with Superintendent José Banda.

The problem may be personality differences but also ineptitude. Too many members come to this board without a clear understanding of what a school board does. A school board member should make policy, advise the superintendent and not try to run the district.

The problems are too big to ignore. This is as much about the current board as it is about how to shape the next board. Board President Kay Smith-Blum and past President Michael DeBell are not seeking re-election. Member Betty Patu is running unopposed.

The Seattle Public Schools has many strong schools and involved communities. But academic quality and progress are uneven. Time wasted on board dysfunction, including time spent on personality conflicts as well as delayed policy decisions, slows momentum on important improvements.

The district has had difficulty keeping top staffers, a problem cited in state audits as an obstacle to substantive progress.

No surprise, district administrators, speaking anonymously to the consultant, complained of heavy micromanaging by board members. Some administrators said they felt their jobs were threatened.

Superintendent Banda used a recent board retreat to remind board members that he is in charge of running the district. The administrators work for him, not the board. The board has one employee: Banda. They will tell him how well his first year has gone on Wednesday when they take up his evaluation.

Research shows a correlation between effective school boards and enhanced student achievement. A study of school boards by the National School Boards Association’s Center for Public Education compared high and low-performing school districts with similar levels of poverty and disadvantaged students. The study found the differences in success could often be attributed to the school board.

For the past five years, the Alliance for Education has paid for leadership and governance training for Seattle’s school board, including quarterly retreats. But the board has had difficulty putting that training into practice.

That must change.

Central District News: New Editor

Your new CD News editor
Posted on June 17, 2013 by Megan Hill

When I noticed the post a few weeks ago announcing Tom Fucoloro’s departure, I had two thoughts: Those are some big shoes to fill. And, I think I can do that.

I’m pleased to announce I’ll have a shot at filling those shoes. I’m stepping in as your new Central District News editor, and I’m excited to be here.

I’m a Central District resident and a freelance writer. You may have seen my name in Edible Seattle or Seattle Weekly; I contribute to both regularly. Though most of my writing as a professional has been feature stories, I’m a trained journalist and I’m looking forward to getting back into hard news and reporting.

And I’m looking forward to putting my own spin on this site. To that end, I hope you’ll be patient with me as I get my sea legs. I hope in time I can create a site that you find reliable and enjoyable.

I also want to hear from you: What are you expectations? What do you like about the site, and what would you like to see change? Your ideas will be a big help moving forward.

Thanks, and let’s make this site a great one.
Share this:15 thoughts on “Your new CD News editor”

Tom Fucoloro on June 17, 2013 at 6:18 pm said:
You’re gonna be great! I look forward to following your coverage of the neighborhood.

Also, my shoes are size 10.5 if anyone wants to buy me some. They’re not too big 🙂
Reply ↓ gia on June 17, 2013 at 6:26 pm said:

congrats on your new job and welcome aboard! One of the things that i enjoy about not only our neighborhood, but this site as well, is the diversity. I hope that we can continue to be the voice of everyone in our neighborhood. Glad to meet you and looking forward to your imprint on this site 🙂
Reply ↓ JohnK on June 17, 2013 at 7:32 pm said:

Congrats to you on your new job and a big hats off to Tom for doing such a great job,,I agree with a previous poster that diversity is very important..The most important thing for me about this site happened today..I heard helicopters flying over my house, I logged on and immediately there was an update on here letting us know the news..Good Luck and we are very lucky to have a website for our neighborhood…..JFK
Reply ↓ Frank on June 17, 2013 at 8:45 pm said:

Welcome and thanks for stepping up!

Ryan A on June 17, 2013 at 10:59 pm said:

Thanks for stepping to the plate Megan. The things I rely most on CDNews for are: breaking CD news; transportation angles; development news; community info; and Grumbo. Good luck!

Eyes on June 18, 2013 at 8:07 am said:
look forward to your direction and growth of the CD news.

Sebastian Garrett-Singh on June 18, 2013 at 8:44 am said: Congratulations Megan. I look forward to seeing your coverage of the CD.

liesbeth robison on June 18, 2013 at 8:51 am said:

welcome new editor. 🙂
I loved all the power outage/mudslide/big tree/roadblock/festival updates. this was always extremely helpful and much appreciated. Thank you Tom and best of luck to you!

John Sewell on June 18, 2013 at 8:55 am said:

Thanks for taking on the job and best wishes! I’m particularly fond of when there are maps and photos along with the stories to help me locate the discussed item in our neighborhood. I hope you’re able to find resources to help with that.

Allecia Vermillion on June 18, 2013 at 8:58 am said:
Congrats Megan! I’m glad my neighborhood news blog will be in such capable hands. And I know I can count on some good beer coverage, too.

FNH on June 18, 2013 at 9:05 am said:
Welcome! I follow this site to keep up with neighborhood news and developments from near and far. Splitting our time between homes in the CD and in TX, CDN keeps us connected to the neighborhood year-round. Thank you to both incoming and outgoing editors for all of your hard work!

ktkeller on June 18, 2013 at 9:37 am said:
Welcome Megan! And thank you Tom for all you have done.
What I like to see: Breaking news and followup, CD focussed, human interest, event and community activities coverage and build a network of people who will report.

My only advice? Stay true to your mission as a journalist and stay strong when there slings and arrows cast 🙂

Omari on June 18, 2013 at 10:06 am said:
Your comment is awaiting moderation.
ARE YOU AFRICAN AMERICAN??? IF NOT YOU NEED A CO-EDITOR THAT IS AFRICAN AMERICAN? HOW IS THAT AFRICATOWN / CENTRAL DISTRICT NEWS WOULD HAVE ONLY A EUROPEAN COLONIAL SETTLER REDLINED / WHITELINED “GENTRIFICATION” EDITOR??????

REALLY IT SHOULD HAVE A DUWAMISH NATIVE AMERICAN EDITOR??? TROUBLE BREWING / IN THE MAKING???? “THE MORE THINGS CHANGE THE MORE THEY REMAIN THE SAME”!!!!! THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES, Omari Tahir, FOUNDER VICE-PRESIDENT AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM AND CULTURE CENTER AT THE “DRONED” FORMER COLMAN SCHOOL SITE AT 23RD AND MASSACHUSETTS, CO-CHAIR BLACK ALLIANCE FOR EDUCATION (1970 TO PRESENT), AFRICATOWN / CENTRAL DISTRICT RESIDENT FOR 67 YEARS (1809 26TH AVE AND 424-24TH AVE EAST.

Del on June 18, 2013 at 10:41 am said:
Welcome aboard! My request? Avoid censorship. Clearly you need to police abusive and off topic language, but if any mention whatsoever – even when all the other news sites are covering it – of certain issues means comments are deleted or stories are just plain ignored as if they don’t exist, well, that makes readers go elsewhere. Fast.

The Structural Genocide That Is Capitalism

Garry Leech, an author who had previously penned a book on the FARC insurgency in Colombia (2011), has assembled a forceful denunciation of the status quo with Capitalism: A Structural Genocide. In essence, he argues cogently in this work that the devastating structural violence experienced by societies subjected to the rule of capital since its historical emergence – and that particularly felt by the world’s presently impoverished social majorities – is, instead of being an aberration or distortion of market imperatives, central and inherent to the division of society along class lines and the enthronement of private property.

Even a cursory examination of the depth of human suffering perpetuated historically and contemporarily by the hegemony of capital should lead disinterested observers to agree with Leech that the catastrophic scale of violence for which this system is responsible can be considered nothing less than genocidal, however shocking such a conclusion might prove to be.

In this book, Leech guides his readers through theoretical examinations of the concept of genocide, showing why the term should in fact be applied to the capitalist mode of production. He then illustrates capitalism’s genocidal proclivities by exploring four case studies: the ongoing legacy of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in Mexico; the relationship between trade liberalization and genetically-modified seeds on the one hand and mass-suicide on the part of Indian agriculturalists on the other; material deprivation and generalized premature death throughout much of the African continent and the global South, as results from hunger, starvation, and preventable disease; and the ever-worsening climatic and environmental crises.

Leech then closes by considering the relevance of Antonio Gramsci’s conceptions of cultural hegemony in attempting to explain the puzzling consent granted to this system by large swathes of the world’s relatively privileged people – specifically, those residing in the imperial core of Europe and the United States – and then recommending the socialist alternative as a concrete means of abolishing genocide, while looking to the Cuban and Venezuelan regimes as imperfect, but inspirational experiments in these terms. In sum, while I take issue with some of his analysis and aspects of his conceptualization of anticapitalist alternatives, his work should certainly be well-received, read and discussed by large multitudes.

Source: www.truth-out.org